28HOME SWEET HOME

In the 1850s, Georgian homes were very popular with the wealthier members of society. These homes were usually made of brick, and are very easy to identify, because of their square and symmetrical look. They are usually 2 or 3 stories tall and have a low-pitched roof. There is no gingerbread or finials, and the whole look is very simple, yet imposing. There is a portico over the door. Some of these homes are difficult to identify because of the Italianate style, which came immediately after. Italianate homes have wide, overhanging eaves, supported by double-bracketing. Bay windows and widow’s walks were also popular elements of this style, all of which could easily be added to a Georgian home.

This picture of the Bycraft home was taken in 1894.  This photo shows six generations raised in this Georgian style home .
This picture of the Bycraft home was taken in 1894. This photo shows six generations raised in this Georgian style home .
The Currie homestead on the 4th line, near Strathroy, Ontario.  this home is a good example of the Gothic Revival style
The Currie homestead on the 4th line, near Strathroy, Ontario. this home is a good example of the Gothic Revival style
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