24WOO! WOO! ALL ABOARD!

After the railway came to Strathroy, nearby villages like Katesville could no longer compete.  The road name and a business are all that is left of Katesville.
After the railway came to Strathroy, nearby villages like Katesville could no longer compete. The road name and a business are all that is left of Katesville.
In other places, the positioning of the railway caused misfortune. Villages not connected to the railway, like Katesville, could not compete with the economic boom in Strathroy. Even though these villages were only a few kilometres away, it was so difficult to transport goods by wagon that the cost was too much for farmers. As a result, Katesville is one of the many ghost towns along the river, created by the railway.

Even in Strathroy itself, the boom of the late 1850ís could not last. By the 1870ís, an economic depression had overtaken the town, and many felt the railway was to blame. In part they were right. The Great Western Railway was the only one in town; citizens were forced to pay their freight prices, regardless of how expensive they might be. Strathroy businessmen believed that if they could get the town connected to another railway companyís tracks, they would be able to bring down prices. Although the village and town councils debated the issue for many years, the existing tracks remained the only ones in town.

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